1:1, CPD, ELT, Entrepreneurialship, Freelancing, Learning, Online Teaching

Let it shine!

abstract beach bright clouds

One of the things that kept me from blogging for years was fear of exposure. Once your words are out anyone can hear them. Some ears will be kind but others won’t, and that’s OK.

I also used to ask myself these questions: What am I going to write about? There are so many blogs about teaching, ELT and freelancing, already.

There is another version of that. When there was an ELT event approaching, and colleagues asked me if I would submit a proposal, that same inner voice would strike again: What am I going to talk about? Who will want to listen to me? Or, what could I possibly say that hasn’t been said before? Etc.

Have you had these thoughts? Have you heard other teachers say that?

This way of thinking can be more harmful than it might seem. When we ask these questions, we are usually comparing ourselves with other people. What we fail to realize is that we each have a voice and our own experience to share. When we teach a lesson, it’s never the same no matter how many times we do it over. So, why would that be different than when we write from our perspective or give a talk?

When someone writes about a topic, or gives a lecture, they’ll bring into light not only the theoretical aspects about it but also their unique view on that subject. We each experience teaching differently. Some made that a career choice before College, while others embraced it later in life after graduating in a different field, such as myself. For this and many other intrinsic reasons, we will have different stories to tell.

Your story, impressions and views on a subject will be yours only.


Don’t wait any longer. Get ready!

Here’s a list of pros to give you that push so you can start writing and submitting proposals to that conference, or event you may be shying away from:

  • The world can benefit from your knowledge. You may say: Oh, but that has been said many times! Maybe, but has it been said by you? Your way, from your perspective? What if you see it through an angle that no one has seen before? How can you know it if you don’t try? It’s like the saying goes, you’re failing before even trying!
  • Promote your business or services to a broader audience. If you hide, who will know about you besides those close to you, your friends and family? You can potentially reach anyone on the planet who sees your website, blog or hear you at a conference, webinar, etc.
  • PLN (Professional Learning Network). It is a good idea to spend some of your online time with other professionals who share your goals. For English teachers, I recommend the following Facebook groups: BrELT – Brazil’s English Language Teachers, Private English Teachers Reloaded, Women in ELT and Global Innovative Language Teachers. Twitter is still going strong for you to make new ELT connections, exchange ideas and chat with professionals and learn about scholarship opportunities, courses, webinars, and so on.
  • Advance in your career. By writing or participating in events as a speaker, you will be taking your teaching career to another level.  The good news is that you can find support from experienced teachers to assist you with all the steps from writing your proposal to preparing your first presentation. Check with the event’s organizers.

Find more help here: From Tesol.org: Tips on Writing Proposals
Alex Tamuli’s excellent webinar on:  Presentation Skills For Teachers


Let me share something with you. I gave my first talk in 2017. Yes, last year! Here’s the opening slide that started it all.

Slide01

 

I had total support from experienced colleagues from BrELT who organized this wonderful event called BrELT on the Road  bringing together teachers who only met online on Facebook to a live event held in Rio de Janeiro.

I was a first time speaker, so I was helped during the entire process. From writing the proposal, to rehearsing my presentation and getting a personal call from Bruno Andrade, the Group’s founder himself who watched my talk and offered me his feedback! How wonderful was that!? In the end I felt energized, happy and accomplished. Some of the teachers who attended my session were beginners, but some were experienced as well. They came to me after the presentation and asked me questions. It felt great! And to think that I almost didn’t do it because, oh well, what could I possibly say that someone hadn’t said before?

My advice? Choose a topic with which you’re familiar. Something you know very well, and have tested again and again. It’ll give you the confidence you need.

By sharing what we know, we can help other people avoid making the same mistakes we made. We can also shed new light onto an old issue.


OK, we all know that sunny days won’t last forever. Some clouds will move in eventually. There will be rainy days. It’s just part of life. In order to succeed as a writer and speaker, you will need to hone your skills like any other professional, but you’ll also need to work on your emotional intelligence. With exposure, comes constructive as well as destructive criticism.  There are all kinds of people out there reading what we write and watching us. That shouldn’t stop us. If you receive destructive criticism, it should serve as fuel to make you write even more! If that happens to you, don’t get bothered with that. Carry on!

Constructive feedback on the other hand is great and should be welcome! It’ll make you a better teacher, writer, lecturer and so on.

We should think the same way when we get to a position when we can offer feedback. First of all, we must ask ourselves, was it solicited? We shouldn’t assume the other person wants our feedback! Instead, we can reach them via inbox if we really mean to help. Remember the feedback I received after my first talk? My colleague contacted me in private and asked me if I wanted his feedback. That’s the way to do it.

I’ll leave you with a picture from my first talk, and it would make me really happy to hear that you have taken the first step to write, or to submit a proposal. I will be giving my 2nd talk this July at BRAZ-TESOL International Conference in Caxias do Sul, Brazil. I couldn’t be happier. I’ve had the support of friends and colleagues to have my proposal accepted yet again. I took the first step, but I also asked for help. Don’t be shy. This is my advice. Teachers are generous. Ask and you shall receive!

Thanks for reading. Till next time!

 

You can find the slides for my presentation here.

“Transitioning to Freelance Teaching: Do’s and Don’ts” (BrELT on The Road, Rio, 2017)

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Let it shine!”

  1. Dear Andrea, I need to say that your post inspired me to create my own blog 🙂 thank you!!
    I loved reading your story, and I totally agree with the points that you have mentioned. Even with those “cloudy days”, I think sharing experiences can benefit other teachers and also help us improve our own practices as we receive feedback.

    1. Dear Mariana, your feedback means a lot to me. Thank you! I’m so glad I’ve inspired you! 😀 Yes, it’s a two way street, we share and we learn! I wish you success!

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